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CACI in Iraq - Frequently Asked Questions
Proven Industry Performance. Defense Intelligence Homeland Security Federal Civilian
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The answers to these questions are CACI's current understanding of the existing facts pertaining to CACI and its work in Iraq and at Abu Ghraib. Of course, as new significant information becomes available CACI may need to change or modify the answers.

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FAQ Table of Contents - 12 total questions

CACI Services in Iraq

Question: As alleged in Robert Greenwald's propaganda DVD, "Iraq for Sale," is CACI a war profiteer?
Answer: No. The term "war profiteering" connotes an extreme and undeserved level of profit. As applied to CACI, that term is a maliciously false accusation. The government received good value from CACI's work efforts and services. No one with access to the facts can reasonably and responsibly contend otherwise. For example, the company's contract was not a cost-plus contract and was less than 1% of the company's total worldwide business (revenue). Equally important, none of the inflated prices, purposeless activity, waste, fraud or abuse alleged in the video against other contractors had any application to CACI.

Question: What services has CACI provided in Iraq?
Answer: CACI employees provided a range of information technology and intelligence services in Iraq. These services included intelligence analysis, background investigations, screenings, interrogation, property management and recordkeeping, and installation of computer systems, software and hardware. Only a small portion of these employees worked as interrogators.

All told, a small number of individuals employed by CACI worked in Iraq at one time or another and their performance was rated exemplary by our customers. No CACI employee or former employee has been indicted for any misconduct in connection with this work, and no CACI employee or former employee appears in any of the photos released from Abu Ghraib. We are extremely proud of the individuals who accepted great personal risk to support the U.S. mission in Iraq.

Question: Is CACI currently providing interrogation services in Iraq?
Answer: CACI is no longer providing interrogation services in Iraq. Those services concluded in the early fall of 2005 upon the conclusion of a contract with the U.S. Army.

Question: Why and when did CACI get into the business of providing interrogators?
Answer: For a number of years CACI has provided IT support and services, including information collection and data analysis, to the U.S. Intelligence Community and the military. Interrogation services were an extension of that work, which CACI provided in response to a request by the U.S. Army, which did not have sufficient, available personnel for assignment to the Iraqi theater at the onset of the war. In August 2003 CACI responded to the Army's request for these services by identifying and hiring qualified individuals with previous experience in information gathering and analysis.

These services were initially provided under a contract issued by the Department of Interior in August 2003. In August 2004 the U.S. Army took the initiative to directly issue CACI a contract to continue providing interrogation services. CACI continued to provide interrogation services under that contract until it expired in the early fall of 2005.

CACI is proud of its efforts to support the U.S. mission in Iraq and the broader effort to fight terrorism.

Question: Does CACI currently provide interrogation services to the U.S. military in Iraq or at any other location such as Guantanamo Bay or Afghanistan?
Answer: CACI does not currently provide interrogation services any where in the world, and it has never provided interrogators for work at Guantanamo or in Afghanistan. Civilian interrogators employed by other private companies have been involved in interrogation at Guantanamo and in Afghanistan, but Iraq is the only place where CACI employees ever provided interrogation services.

CACI Employees in Iraq

Question: How has CACI responded to allegations of misconduct by a few of its former employees?
Answer: From the first reports about prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib and for the entire time since CACI has made the truth its top priority. We have cooperated fully with every government investigation, and we made clear that we would not condone or tolerate illegal or inappropriate behavior by any employee when engaged in CACI business. We have communicated openly and fully with our employees, our shareholders and the public about our performance in Iraq. And, as necessary, we have endeavored to set the record straight whenever and wherever we have learned of misstatements about CACI or our employees.

Question: Have any CACI employees been indicted or found guilty of misconduct involving detainees at Abu Ghraib or elsewhere in Iraq?
Answer: As of April 7, 2008 more than three years after the initial reports of abuse, no current or former CACI employee has been indicted by the United States for misconduct in the treatment of detainees in Iraq. To this day there is no evidence we are aware of that any CACI employee participated in the type of behavior seen in the horrifying photos that accompanied the first reports of abuse, and no CACI employee appears in any of those pictures.

At the same time, we remain very disheartened that three individuals were mentioned in an August 2004 report by U.S. Army Maj. Gen. George R. Fay and Lt. Gen. Anthony R. Jones in connection with some other possible abuse. None of these individuals are now employed by CACI. Their relationship with CACI ended more than a year and a half ago. These men left the company in 2004.

Question: Are any of the individuals named in official reports as possibly acting inappropriately currently employed by CACI?
Answer: No. None of these individuals are now employed by CACI. Their relationship with CACI ended more than a year and a half ago. These men left the company in 2004.

Question: How many interrogators did CACI provide in Iraq and over what period of time?
Answer: During the two year period between August 2003 and August 2005, 60 different employees of CACI served in Iraq as interrogators under the direct command and supervision of the U.S. Army. The number of CACI employees working as interrogators at any one time never exceeded 28.

Government Inquiries and Investigations

Question: Has CACI cooperated with government investigations?
Answer: From the first day, CACI has cooperated fully with all government investigations, civilian as well as military. We have responded to all information requests, not only about our work in Iraq, but also about contract procedures.

Question: What have government reports on Abu Ghraib said about CACI?
Answer: Government reports have generally concluded that civilian interrogators performed their duties in an appropriate fashion and made a major contribution to the U.S. mission in Iraq. For example, a March 2005 report by U.S. Navy Inspector General and Vice Admiral Albert T. Church recognized the value and diligent service of civilian interrogators provided by CACI and other private contractors.

In an unclassified Executive Summary released by Admiral Church, the report concluded

  • "Contractors made a significant contribution to U.S. intelligence efforts"
  • On average, contractors were more experienced than military interrogators and that this advantage enhanced their credibility with detainees and promoted successful interrogations
  • "Contract personnel often served longer tours than DoD personnel, creating continuity and enhancing corporate knowledge for their commands," and
  • Despite the publicity surrounding Abu Ghraib, "we found very few instances of abuse involving contractors."

Earlier reports by former Defense Secretary James Schlesinger also praised the performance of civilian personnel. Although identifying some instances of possible abuse, a report by U.S. Army Maj. Gen. George R. Fay and Lt. Gen. Anthony R. Jones also noted that most civilians performed their jobs in a professional manner.

CACI's Efforts to Find the Truth

Question: What was CACI's response to initial reports about Abu Ghraib?
Answer: From the first reports about prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib and for the entire time since CACI has made the truth its top priority. We have cooperated fully with every government investigation, civilian and military, and we made clear that we would not condone or tolerate illegal or inappropriate behavior by any employee when engaged in CACI business. We have communicated openly and fully with our employees, our shareholders and the public about our performance in Iraq. We've answered thousands of inquiries from the news media, responding by phone, email, letter and press release, and also created a special section on our corporate website to provide information. And, as necessary, we have endeavored to set the record straight whenever and wherever we have learned of misstatements about CACI or our employees.

CACI will continue to support its U.S. military customers with information technology services and solutions that are vital to the well being of both the American soldiers putting their lives on the line every day as well as to the freedom loving Iraqi people.

We are very disheartened that three of our employees are mentioned in possible connection with some alleged form of abuse and, if these acts occurred, the company does not condone them. We have stated before that none of our employees were involved in the horrendous types of abuse that have been pictured in the media. And no CACI employee has been indicted for any misconduct in connection with our work in Iraq.

With the August 25, 2004 release of the U.S. Army report by Maj. Gen. George R. Fay and Lt. Gen. Anthony R. Jones (the "Fay-Jones Report"), we stand by that statement. As stated in the subsequent CACI news release of August 26, 2004, we were not involved with horrendous abuses such as death or sexual assault at Abu Ghraib.

While these interrogator services were a small part of our overall business, they were crucial to our customer at war with a determined enemy. When the customer needs our services, we are proud to be of assistance.

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